Caution: New Substances of Very High Concern

Caution: New Substances of Very High Concern

In July 2019, the European Chemical Agency (ECHA) added four new substances to the REACH candidate list of Substances of Very High Concern SVHC, extending the list to a total of 201 substances. The candidate list describes substances that may have a negative impact on human health or the environment. Producers, importers or suppliers of products that contain SVHC-listed substances are obliged to notify ECHA when they are located in the Europen Union, the total quantity of the listed substance used is more than one tone per year and/or the listed substance is present at more than 0.1% of the mass of one produced object.

See the full SVHC list here. It is frequently updated, last in july 2019. Find out all about ECHA and REACH in our previous blog post “How the European Union regulates Chemicals”. The four new substances included in the candidate list of  Substances of Very High Concern (SVHC) are:

  • 2-methoxyethyl acetate
  • 4-tert-butylphenol
  • Tris(4-nonylphenyl, branched and linear) phosphite (TNPP) with ≥ 0.1% w/w of 4-nonylphenol, branched and linear (4-NP)
  • 3,3,3-tetrafluoro-2-(heptafluoropropoxy) propionic acid, its salts and its acyl halides

The substances were included due to their toxicity to reproduction, endocrine disruption and a combination of other properties. Hit the drop-down windows below to find out why exactly a specific substance was included.

2-methoxyethyl acetate

ApplicationSolvent for nitrocellulose, cellulose acetate, various gums, resins, waxes, oils, textile printing, photographic film and lacquers.

Reason for inclusion: Toxic for reproduction Article 57 (c)

CAS NO: 110-49-6

Sweden initially proposed the substance to the SVHC’s listing.

4-tert-butylphenol

Application: Used in coating products, polymers, adhesives, sealants and for the synthesis of other substances.

Reason for inclusion: Endocrine disrupting properties Article 57(f) – environment

CAS No: 98-54-4

Germany initially proposed the substance to the SVHC’s listing.

Tris(4-nonylphenyl, branched and linear)..

Applications: Antioxidant to stabilize polymers.

Reason for inclusion: Endocrine disrupting properties Article 57(f) – environment.

France initially proposed the substance to the SVHC’s listing.

3,3,3-tetrafluoro-2-(heptafluoropropoxy)..

Applications: Processing aid in the production of fluorinated polymers.

Reason for inclusion: Equivalent level of concern having probable serious effects to the environment Article 57(f) – environmentEquivalent level of concern having probable serious effects to human health Article 57(f) – human health.

What happens next? 

Once the substances are on the SVHC List, companies may have legal obligations, which are described in detail here. These obligations apply to the listed substance on its own, in mixtures or in articles. Any supplier of articles containing a candidate list substance (above a concentration of 0.1 % w/w) has the obligation to inform customers down the entire supply chain and further any downstream user. This process is linked to safety data sheets.

Update your Safety Data Sheet

Article 31 of REACH states that affected companies must provide a safety data sheet, compiled in accordance with Annex II. The safety data sheet must be dated and shall contain the following headings:

Safety Data Sheet Headings

1. identification of the substance/preparation and of the company/undertaking;

2. hazards identification;

3. composition/information on ingredients;

4. first-aid measures;

5. fire-fighting measures;

6. accidental release measures;

7. handling and storage;

8. exposure controls/personal protection;

9. physical and chemical properties;

10. stability and reactivity;

11. toxicological information;

12. ecological information;

13. disposal considerations;

14. transport information;

15. regulatory information;

16. other information.

In particular, section 15.1 of the safety data sheet must be updated, if the product, mixture or article contains a candidate list substance. Section 15.1 of the safety data sheet informs users about safety, health and environmental regulations and legislations that apply to the specific substance, mixture or article. This includes the question whether the substance is subject to any prohibitions or restrictions in the country or region into which it is being supplied. Further, the safety data sheet must be in an official language of the member state where the substance is placed on the market. Companies which are producing, supplying or importing products that contain SVHC-listed substances in europe are obliged to update the safety data sheet without delay

  • as soon as new information which may affect the risk management measures, or new information on hazards becomes available,
  • once an authorisation has been granted or refused,
  • once a restriction has been imposed.

Moreover, importers and producers of articles containing the substance have six months from the date of its inclusion in the candidate list to notify ECHA. For the four substances listed above the six-month notification time period will end in mid-January of 2020. According to Article 31 (4) of REACH, the update of the safety data sheet can be skipped if the “(…) dangerous substances (…) are provided with sufficient information to enable users to take the necessary measures as regards [to] the protection of human health, safety and the environment, unless requested by a downstream user or distributor.”

Our Standing

In every case, CheMondis supports any legislation that promotes sustainability along the industrial supply chain and beyond. We trust the assessment of the European Chemical Agency and comply with it. On the marketplace thousands of chemical products have already been uploaded and more and more are following every day. As our approach to contribute to Article 30 of REACH, we take it upon us to raise awareness around it on our marketplace.

When uploading products onto CheMondis, sellers have the possibility to state if the specific product is bound to article 30 of REACH. This makes it easy for sellers to be transparent on their product content. Also, sellers on CheMondis can upload safety data sheets to all of their products. All safety data sheets are regularly examined by our chemical product managers as a double check to detect possible misunderstandings. Particularly the check of safety data sheets of products that contain SVHC listed products, is mandatory to us.

We want to encourage sellers and buyers on CheMondis to comply with REACH regulations. Also, when buyers and sellers operate outside of the European Union. A number of countries outside of the European Union have started to implement REACH regulations as well or are in the process of adopting such a regulatory framework under the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS).

China, the largest chemical manufacturer in the world, has also moved towards a more efficient and coherent system for the control of chemicals in compliance with GHS. Balkan countries such as Croatia and Serbia are in the process of adopting the EU REACH system under the auspices of the EU IPA program. Switzerland has moved towards implementation of REACH through partial revision of the Swiss Chemical Ordinance. Turkey has also paved the way to adopt REACH with the new Chemicals Management Regulation.

Now it is up to you

What do you think of the four new substances on the candidate list? Have you updated your safety data sheets yet? What do you think of section 15? And do you think Article 31 (4) of REACH is a free ticket for affected sellers? Let us know and leave a comment in the section below!

Thanks for taking the time to read the CheMondis Blog. 

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The Glycerin Market: High Demand, Low Prices and the Impact of Biodiesel

The Glycerin Market: High Demand, Low Prices and the Impact of Biodiesel

Worldwide there are more then 1,500 known applications for glycerin. This is a huge amount and the reason why we decided to look into it in more detail. This article briefly presents the properties of glycerin, their production and the industrial applications. Further we will describe the impact of biodiesel production on glycerin prices.

Glycerin, also known as glycerol, is defined by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) as Propane-1,2,3-triol. It belongs to the group of polyols, which are organic compounds that contain multiple hydroxyl functional groups used for organic reactions. The sweet-tasting, colorless and odorless, (in low concentration) non-toxic alcohol, melts at 18° Celsius and boils at 290° Celsius. In very simple terms, glycerin is an organic mixture of sugar and alcohol.

Industrial Applications of Glycerin

Glycerin has many industrial applications within the chemical industry and beyond. It functions as a building block and raw material to manufacture different types of chemical intermediates and products. A few examples are listed below.

Food Industry

Glycerin serves as a sweetener, solvent, and humectant in foods and beverages and can also help in preserving food. It is also used in commercially prepared low-fat foods as a filler and in liqueurs as a thickening agent. Further it is used as a sugar substitute. Although glycerol is slightly more caloric, it doesn’t cause dental cavities and has a low glycemic index.

Pharmaceutical and Personal Care

Glycerin is utilized in pharmaceutical and personal care products (including body washes, shampoos, soaps,  toothpastes etc.) largely due to its smoothness, its ability to lubricate and moisturize. In liquid detergents, glycerin has an important role as viscosity regulator, solvent and clarifying agent.

E-cigarette Liquid

Vegetable glycerin with propylene glycol, is one of the common components of e-cigarette liquid. The glycerin produces the aerosol when heated with an atomizer, delivering nicotine to the consumer.

Anti Freezing Agent

Due to its minimum freezing point temperature, glycerin was used as an anti-freezing agent for automotive applications before being replaced by ethylene glycerin. Its freezing point is around −38 °C, corresponding to 70% glycerin in water. Also glycerin is a common compound of solvents for enzymatic reagents in labs.

Chemical Intermediate and Solvent

Glycerin is used as a chemical reagent in the synthesis of nitroglycerin for the production of dynamite. Further, it is a building block in the polymer production of alkyd resins and polyurethanes for use in paints and coatings. Glycerin is also a raw material to manufacture different types of chemical intermediates, including solvents, plasticizers and surfactants. Besides that, glycerin can dissolve polar and nonpolar substances, making it a possible solvent to be used in many industries with different applications.

Production of Glycerin

Glycerin is produced by hydrolysis, saponification or transesterification of triglycerides. Triglycerides sources are commonly plants, like soybeans, and animals, such as tallow. Glycerin from triglycerides is produced worldwide on a large scale. The quality (parameters of purity) can vary from producer to producer depending on the production process.

Post-purification can be achieved by treatment with activated carbon to remove organic impurities, alkali to remove unreacted glycerin esters and ion exchangers to remove salts. High purity glycerin (> 99.5%) is obtained by multi-step vacuum distillation. Glycerin can also be produced by various routes from propylene, which is a three carbon petrochemical compound with double bonds. The most relevant process includes propylene chlorination. A variety of glycerin products with different purities are currently supplied by multiple companies on CheMondis.

Why is Glycerin selling low?

The standard of living around the world has risen. Especially in developing countries a new growing demand for pharmaceuticals and personal care products has evolved. Thus, resulting in larger international consumption amounts of glycerin. Although the overall consumption of glycerin has continuously risen prices are on the low. One of many factors may be the increase of biodiesel production, also known as the bio-diesel-revolution.

Glycerin is a byproduct in the production process of biodiesel. Although the glycerin produced in the biodiesel process is of low quality (80% purity), and still contains contaminants like soap and water, it still can be used for pharmaceutical or technical grade products. In order to do so, the produced glycerin must undergo a post-purification process (as mentioned above).

For the last two decades biodiesel production in Europe has increased continuously. This trend can possibly be linked to the European Union directive from 2003, “Transport Biofuels Directive 2003/30/EC”, which promotes the use of biodiesel as an alternative to fossil fuels (petrol/diesel). According to the directive, EU member states were obliged to replace 5,75% of all transport fossil fuels with bio fossil fuels by 2010. Many other governments outside of the European Union have introduced similar agendas to promote the use of biodiesels. For instance, the “Brazilian Biodiesel Technology Development Program”. Although the European Union failed to achieve the targeted 5,75% by 2010, the production of biodiesel has risen.

During 2016 producers within the European union processed around  12 million tons of biodiesel according to the European Biodiesel BoardIn Germany alone, around 3 million tons of biodiesel were produced. This makes Germany the largest producer of biodiesel in the European Union. Followed by France, the Netherlands and Spain which each produced between 1-2 million tons of biodiesel in 2016. Ultimately a high production of biodiesel lead to an increase in glycerin availability. Driving prices down, although the overall international glycerin demand is rising.

In a Nutshell

Glycerin is an organic mixture of sugar and alcohol. It can be produced by hydrolysis, saponification or transesterification of triglycerides. Quality can vary from producer to producer depending on the production process. Glycerin has many industrial applications. Leading to a continuously rising glycerin demand. Low glycerin prices can (but not only) be linked to the increase in bio-diesel production.

Now it is up to you!

What is your experience with glycerin? Have you bought or sold it on CheMondis? What do you think of directives that promote bio-diesel production? And what other information could be relevant when discussing glycerin? Leave a comment below and let us know.

Thanks for taking the time to read the CheMondis Blog. 

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New substances added to the SVHC candidate list

New substances added to the SVHC candidate list

REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals) is a European regulation. It addresses the production and use of chemical substances, and their potential impacts on both human health and the environment. The regulation also established the European Chemical Agency (ECHA), which manages the technical, scientific and administrative aspects of REACH.

REACH describes substances of very high concern (SVHC). Producers, importers or suppliers of products that contain SVHC-listed substances are obliged to notify ECHA when:

  • working in Europe, 
  • and the total quantity used is more than one tone per year,
  • and/or the SVHC is present at more than 0.1% of the mass of one produced object.

ECHA has included 6 new substances to the SVHC list for authorization, extending it to a total of 197 substances. Four of the substances, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, were added to the SVHC list with the involvement of the Member State Committee (MSC) after public consultation. More information about the substances and reasons for their inclusion on the SVHC list are informed below. 

Following substances were added to the SVHC list:

Pyrene

Reason for inclusion: Substance is toxic, very persistent and very bioaccumulative in accordance with the criteria set out in Annex XIII.

CAS No.: 129-00-0; 1218-52-1

Phenanthrene

Reason for inclusion: Substance is very persistent and very bioaccumulative in accordance with the citeria set out in Annex XIII.

 

CAS No.: 85-01-08

3-Benzylidenecamphor

Reason for inclusion: Substance is toxic for reproduction (article 57c).

CAS No.: 15087-24-8

2,2-bis(4'-hydroxyphenyl)-4-methylpentane

Reason for inclusion: Substance is carcinogenic (article 57a), toxic (article 57d), very persistent and very bioaccumulative (article 57e).

CAS No.: 6807-17-6

Benzo[k]fluoranthene

Reason for inclusion: Substance is carcinogenic (article 57a), toxic (article 57d), very persistent and very bioaccumulative (article 57e).

CAS No.: 207-08-9

Fluoranthene

Reason for inclusion: substance is toxic, very persistent and very bioaccumuative in accordance with the citeria set out in Annex XIII.

 

CAS No.: 206-44-0 ; 93951-690

Once a substance is put on the candidate list, producers, importers or suppliers may have to consider legal obligations, described in detail here.

What Do you think?

Should the classification be approved or not? What is your opinion? Leave a comment below and let us know. 

Thanks for taking the time to read the CheMondis Blog. #TEAMCHEMONDIS

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Applications of Modern Nanotechnology

Applications of Modern Nanotechnology

Nanotechnology – widely applied

In the past nanotechnology sounded like science-fiction, nowadays it is fully incorporated in our daily lives. Even if we don’t always notice nano-particles – they are widely applied in chemical and downstream industries. Nanoparticles have unique physical and chemical properties due to their high surface area and nanoscale size (ranging from 1nm-100nm). The properties are dependent on the particle size and shape, allowing the possibility of tuning the material according to the required characteristics.

Figure 1: Properties that are improved when a bulk material is produced as the analogous nanoparticle, and the respective applications derived from them. 

As shown in figure 1, the decrease of size from materials in microsize to nanosized, causes:
  • an increase in the surface area
  • anti-bacterial properties
  • hardness
  • electron band gap
  • changes in the optical, electric and magnetic properties.

Due to these characteristics, they are suitable candidates for various commercial and domestic applications, which include catalysis, imaging, medical applications, energy-based research, and environmental applications.

Main applications of nanomaterials
  • Paints & coatings
  • Cosmetics
  • Catalysts
  • Lightening / display industry
  • Energy sector: solar cells / batteries
  • Membranes and filters

Cosmetics

After recognizing the estrogen-like activity of numerous organic sunscreen additives, inorganic UV absorbing pigments based on titania nanoparticles and zinc oxide were introduced at a large scale to the cosmetics industry.

There, nanoparticles were advantageous since they range below 50 nm. Visible light scattering becomes negligible, and corresponding UV protection can be realized with reduced whitening effect that is typical on sunscreen products.

Other applications of Nanoparticles in the cosmetic industry include skin creams and lotions. These use proteins derived from stem cells or other nutrients. Which are encapsulated in nanoparticles and merge with the membranes of skin cells to allow an active delivery in deeper skin layers.

Paints &Coatings

Additives containing nanoscale materials have previously been used in the production of paints and coatings. For example, barium sulphate and iron oxide as coloring pigments and synthetic amorphous silica to influence the fluidity of product.

Today it is possible to tailor the nanostructures in the coating industry to the specific needs of the various applications. Novel nano-based coatings are used today, for instance, to functionalize surfaces, to provide protection against corrosion and dirt, to prevent biological soiling and graffiti or to create attractive designs by special color effects. The German Paint and Printing Ink Industry Association (VdL) estimates that by 2020 about 20 % of the turnover in Germany will come from the use of nanotechnology.

Lightening 

With more efficient and cheaper technologies, LED lighting and displays have allowed ultra flat, very bright and power-saving applications.

Most recently, quantum dots (semiconductor nanoparticles with dimensions of up to 10 nm) have become one of the most promising optoelectronic materials. Quantum dots have tunable and valuable  properties. They are assumed to be the next-generation display technology. Quantum-Dot-based materials have purer colors, longer lifetime, lower manufacturing cost, and lower power consumption. Another key advantage of the quantum dot displays is that, because Quantum Dots can be deposited on virtually any substrate, one can expect printable and flexible – even foldable – displays of all sizes.

Energy sector: solar cells, batteries

Solar cells are exposed to intense radiation – this creates a strong demand for extremely bleach resistant materials.

Further it puts severe limitations on the use of organic materials, particularly when designing organic photovoltaics. As a result, the design of increasingly or even predominantly inorganic solar cells is a major research area, and functional layers are subsequently replaced using nanoparticle-based inks.

A recent example is the so-called hole injection layers, today accessible using transition metal oxide nanoparticles.

On top of that, nanoparticles have been changing the battery industry due to the production of materials with nanopore. This allows a selective exchange and transport of some components.

Membranes and filters

Traditional manufacturing of water filtration membranes is based on so called phase inversion. Here, a nonsolvent is used to precipitate a polymer in the form of a pre-shaped, partially dissolved film. This elegant process suffers from huge solvent consumption and a difficult process control.

Splitting up film formation and nanopore generation, recently afforded an easy to control process. First leading to a composite film that is subsequently converted into the final porous Membrane.

Catalysts 

Nanomaterial-based catalysts are usually heterogeneous catalysts, broken up into metal nanoparticles – in order to speed up the catalytic process. Metal nanoparticles have a higher surface area. There is increased catalytic activity, in comparison to the analogous bulk material, because more catalytic reactions can occur at the same time. 

Nanoparticle-surface supports heterogeneous catalysts, permitting the materials to be dispersed in a reaction medium and rapidly removed when isolating a product.

The surface activity of gold is undoubtedly the most prominent and outstanding example with industrial relevance. 

Thank´s for taking the time to read the CheMondis Blog. #TEAMCHEMONDIS

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How the European Union regulates Chemicals

How the European Union regulates Chemicals

What is REACH?

The chemical industry supplies raw materials to almost every other industry and is essential for economic competitiveness. Although essential, chemicals must be properly managed to avoid damage to human health and the environment. Each country or economic union has its specific way of regulating and controlling chemicals. Within the European Union we have REACH

REACH stands for Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals. It is a European Union regulation that addresses the production and use of chemical substances, and their potential impacts on both human health and the environment. REACH came into force on the first of June 2007 and has been described as the most complex legislation in the European Union’s history.

REACH AIM: Improve the protection of human health and the environment from the risks that can be posed by chemicals and promote alternative methods for the assessment of hazards of substances.

How does REACH work?

REACH establishes procedures for collecting and assessing information on the properties and hazards of substances. The regulation has been established by the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA), which manages the technical, scientific and administrative aspects of REACH. ECHA receives and evaluates individual registrations for their compliance. Further EU member states evaluate selected substances to clarify initial concerns for human health or for the environment. Authorities and ECHA’s scientific committees assess whether the risks of substances can be managed.

To comply with the regulation, companies must identify and manage the risks linked to the substances they manufacture and market in the EU. They must demonstrate how the substance can be safely used, and they must communicate the risk management measures to the users. If the risks cannot be managed, authorities can restrict the use of substances. All legal information can be found in REGULATION (EC) No 1907/2006 OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL”

Which companies does REACH affect?

REACH obligations are not only complied to manufacturers of chemical substances, but also to all companies which deal with preparations of the product or articles that contain those substances. For this reason, REACH has an impact on a wide range of companies across many sectors. If you are an importer of chemical and non-chemical products (such as paints, clothes, furniture, plastic, etc.) you need to ensure that all components should be registered under REACH. Companies established outside the EU are not bound to the obligations of REACH. The responsibility for fulfilling the requirements of REACH, lies with the importers established in the European Union, or with the only representative of a non-EU manufacturer established in the European Union. REACH applies to substances manufactured or imported in quantities of 1 tonne or more per year, per manufacturer/importer. Some substances are excluded from all or certain aspects of REACH.

Total exemptions
  • Radio-active substances
  • Substances under customs supervision
  • Substances used in the interest of defense and covered by National exemptions
  • Waste
  • Non-isolated intermediates and transported substance
Partial exemptions
    • Substances used in food
    • Medicinal products;
    • Substances included in Annex IV of the REACH Regulation which are known to be safe (such as Nitrogen)
    • Corn
    • Oil
    • Substances covered by Annex V of the REACH Regulation
    • Substances which occur in nature, if they are not chemically modified
    • Minerals
    • ores, ore concentrates
    • cement clinker
    • natural gas
    • liquefied petroleum gas
    • natural gas condensate, process gases and components thereof
    • crude oil, coal, coke
    • Substances occurring in nature other than those listed under paragraph 7, if they are not chemically modified, unless they meet the criteria for classification as dangerous according to Directive 67/548/EEC. (Examples include beewax and some fibres)
    • Polymers (however, monomer shall be registered)
    • Recycled or recovered substance already registered
    • Re-imported substance
    • Substances used for the purposes of product and process-oriented research and development (PPORD) Note: PPORD notification shall be submitted instead.  

     

Legislation in non-EU countries

A number of countries outside of the European Union have started to implement REACH regulations or are in the process of adopting such a regulatory framework to approach a more globalized system of chemical registration under the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS).  

China, the largest chemical manufacturer in the world, has also moved towards a more efficient and coherent system for the control of chemicals in compliance with GHS. Balkan countries such as Croatia and Serbia are in the process of adopting the EU REACH system under the auspices of the EU IPA program. Switzerland has moved towards implementation of REACH through partial revision of the Swiss Chemical Ordinance. Turkey has also paved the way to adopt REACH with the new Chemicals Management Regulation.

Transported isolated intermediates 

Manufacturers or importers of transported isolated intermediates in quantities of 1 tonne or more per year need to submit a registration dossier (unless the substance is exempted from the registration provisions). The information to be submitted for standard registration purposes is listed under article 10. However, a registrant of transported isolated intermediates can provide reduced registration information according to article 18 (2) if he confirms that he is manufacturing and/or using the substance under strictly controlled conditions and if he confirms himself or states that he has received confirmation from the user that the substance is used under strictly controlled conditions as described under article 18 (4). In that case both the registrant and the users are each liable for their own statement regarding the strictly controlled conditions.

Article 18 on CheMondis

As described in our Terms & Conditions, suppliers must comply with the regulations in order to sell their products on CheMondis. Next to safety and technical data sheets, users can add other relevant information about their products. Further, suppliers are requested to tick a specific box indicating that their products are regulated by article 18, which covers the registration of transported isolated intermediates. 

Our chemical team constantly re-checks all product information, including the indications about article 18. Nevertheless, CheMondis cannot be heald liable for all information provided by third-party-sellers. 

Thank´s for taking the time to read the CheMondis Blog. #TEAMCHEMONDIS

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Future Energy Storage Technology

Future Energy Storage Technology

Solid-State-Batteries

Producing efficient energetic sources, that keep up with the world’s demand, is a challenge that goes hand in hand, with creating means of energy storage. Conventional lithium-ion batteries have nearly reached their physical limits, restraining advances on electronics, renewable energy, e-vehicles and several other industries. Solid-state batteries are an emerging promising option – as the next generation energy storage technology.

Conventional battery technology

Battery technologies, applied nowadays, are based on two solid metal electrodes, with a lithium salt serving as a media for the ions flow. As the battery charges, the ions move through the liquid electrolyte, from the cathode metal to the anode metal, and the other way around when the battery discharges. Cathodes are typically made of different classes of Li-based oxides, phosphates, such as lithium cobalt oxide. While anodes are typically made of titanates, Li-alloys and metallic lithium and carbon forms, such as graphite.

Disadvantages 

  • The lithium price is high (=High production cost)
  • Reduced lifetime, due to a natural charge-discharge degrading effect
  • High temperature sensitivity, causing faster deterioration
  • The decomposition of the electrolytes releases hydrogen gas, can result in explosions.
  • Risk of leakage and/or corrosion, due to the liquid electrolyte 

 

Solid-state battery technology

Solid-state (SS) batteries, on the other hand, use a solid material to promote the ion flow. The cell chemistry, of solid-state cells, is in general the same as of liquid electrolyte cells. Solid electrolytes are produced using polyethylene glycol and conducting Li-based materials (salts, ceramics and glasses).

Advantages

  • Solid-State batteries contain no flammable material
  • cannot produce hydrogen gas (dramatic improvement in operational safety)
  • Allows for the use of higher-voltage cathode materials, which improves energy density (more energy storage / same battery size)
  • They weigh less and require less space (Since no cooling system is reuqiered)
  • Solid-state batteries can potentially cycle 10–100 times more than liquid batteries
  • Stability of SSEs also allows solid-state batteries to be charged and discharged at very high rates without unwanted side reactions, which increases the scope of application

But nothing is perfect

Solid state batteries are still more expensive than conventional energy storage technologies. A study from the University of Florida has estimated that a typical cell phone-sized solid-state battery would cost about $15,000 to manufacture. One battery big enough to power an electric car would cost, somewhat around $100,000. One of the causes for this is, once again, the high costs of lithium on the market. Therefore, several on-going studies focus on finding out alternative materials for electrodes and electrolytes.

Thank´s for taking the time to read the CheMondis Blog. #TEAMCHEMONDIS

CheMondis at the 2019 K Trade Fair

Only a few more days to go and we are finalizing the last arrangements for the @K. Get insights of our marketplace while participating in our competition and win an amazing price. See you their next week meet us at booth C28 in hall 7.